(Source: elosilla)

(Reblogged from chjorniy-voron)

distractedbyshinyobjects:

drcabl3:

jessicreep:

kittydoom:

A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair

Um yes!

I still want to bulk buy these and adonize  batch pink.

Apart from being super cool - which it definitely is - the serrated side cuts through braided rope, and though I haven’t seen it in person I’d be willing to bet money the smallest (“flat phillips”) screwdriver picks handcuffs.

Ladies, this is an escape tool.

(Reblogged from gethenian)

gethenian:

wolvensnothere:

thepurposeofplaying:

alljustletters:

narcomanic:

narcomanic:

i’m pretty sure this twitter account is how sexting works in night vale

i mean really

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what is going on here

this is officially my new favourite thing

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thank you for sharing it with us

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SEXTS FROM THE VOID

This is my new favourite thing ever. 

(Reblogged from gethenian)

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(Reblogged from johnskylar)

penandpage:

xerxes93:

sansastans:

Sansa Stark meme: 1/10 scenes

“Sansa!” The boyish shout rang across the yard; Joffrey had seen her. “Sansa, here!”

He calls me as if he were calling a dog, she thought.

what I really love about this scene is that Sansa is trying to emotionally manipulate Joffrey into going to the most dangerous area of the fight. Don’t tell me she’s just a passive player, she picks her battles where she can and this is her shining moment of defiance. 

(Reblogged from krusca)

certifiedhypocrite:

hyenadip:

bogleech:

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

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Did you guess yet?

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If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

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Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

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Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

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Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

Burton didn’t even have a TANGENTIAL connection to Coraline but because it was advertised as “from the director of Nightmare Before Christmas” and people think Burton directed Nightmare (or even wrote the script or did much of anything but visit the set off and on) they still equate Coraline with him.

The same thing happens to “9” because people don’t get what “produced by” means.

FUCKING THANK YOU.

I believe the success of these titles is falls singly upon Henry selick’s involvement. and it pisses me off to no end when people just attribute the qualities that made those movies special [ mostly nightmare/james and the giant peach ] with tim burton

It’s selicks’ touches. his level of detail in cloth. his love for strange warped metal surfaces/blades and insects that always seem to be prevalent in his works that sort of attracted me/wow’ed me in those movies

I mean look what happened when burton DID do a stop-motion title. corpse bride. It was a nice movie, sorta okay plot. but the visual style was kinda crap. other than the contrast between the world of the living/dead everything was just sorta smoothed out and bland design wise :\

Dang!

(Reblogged from calmnivore)
(Reblogged from thedragons-nest)
patrickat:

monobeartheater:

absorr:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts 

 Some of you are reblogging because you think its funny that programmers would talk to ducks. I’m reblogging because I think its funny picturing a programmer explaining their code, realizing what they did when they explain the bad code, then grabbing the strangling the duck while yelling “WHY WAS THE FIX THAT SIMPLE!? AM I GOING BLIND!”

AS A PROGRAMMER I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT YOU FUCKING DO WE HAD TO BAN THE DUCKS FROM MY CLASSES BECAUSE EVERYONE WOULD FLIP THE DUCK OR THROW IT AT A WALL OR SOMETHING WHEN THEY FIGURED OUT THE PROBLEM IN THEIR CODE

Arthur Weasley finally has his answer.

patrickat:

monobeartheater:

absorr:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts

 Some of you are reblogging because you think its funny that programmers would talk to ducks. I’m reblogging because I think its funny picturing a programmer explaining their code, realizing what they did when they explain the bad code, then grabbing the strangling the duck while yelling “WHY WAS THE FIX THAT SIMPLE!? AM I GOING BLIND!”

AS A PROGRAMMER I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT YOU FUCKING DO WE HAD TO BAN THE DUCKS FROM MY CLASSES BECAUSE EVERYONE WOULD FLIP THE DUCK OR THROW IT AT A WALL OR SOMETHING WHEN THEY FIGURED OUT THE PROBLEM IN THEIR CODE

Arthur Weasley finally has his answer.

(Reblogged from johnskylar)
(Reblogged from johnskylar)

catfoxwolf:

Disquiet (Part I of II) 

Part II is here.

I could probably spend another week fine-tuning this comic, but it’s time to let go. Thanks for reading.  

(Named after The Book of Disquiet, by the Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa.)

(Reblogged from gethenian)